Thursday, 15 October 2009

Do You See What I See?

Silly question, really; of course you don't. But maybe, if I try very hard, I will be able to give you an inkling of things I noticed Monday morning, on my way to Waitrose. There are several routes I can take. One winds through little alleyways, in and out. Another follows the slightly wider side roads, lined with fairly imposing detached properties, while a third, after crossing the main Havant road with its rushing cars and occasional bicycle or bus, veers to the left and passes St Faith's Church Hall, before a final sharp right brings you to the welcoming arms of Waitrose with its shelves full of groceries. This was the way I chose.

It's the old, brick wall boundary of the Church Hall that catches my attention. It stands well above head height and its rounded top sports a few tufts of various mosses, like an old man might sprout a last few hairs before baldness claims him. The bricks are pitted, even crumbling in places, and display a wide range of glowing colours, appropriately enough at present, in Autumn shades : warm russet: pinkish, brick-red: red-gold amber and lastly, occasional deeper tints and tones of maroon to black. In the light of a sunny morning, the wall glows, despite being in shade.

I walk slowly by, drinking in the colours, but then, I notice how out of kilter its perpendicular lines are, as it gradually curves round the car park area of the hall. At the start, its top tilts slightly to the left, but further along it straightens, then eventually, tilts a little to the right. Somehow, it gives the impression as I move past, that it's slowly changing position to ease it's weary bones, like an arthritic person putting their weight first on one foot, then the other. Several of the double width columns that strengthen it at intervals, have sturdy pieces of wood bolted to the top two and a half feet of the brickwork. The bolts are rusty round their circumferences, and the wooden buttresses are weathered to a light silvery grey. Perpendicular ruts and runnels texture their surfaces, give an indication of their age.

Over to the right, once the Church Hall and it's adjacent building which houses a Nursery School have been negotiated, are a group of small cottages. They have Georgian looking, small paned windows, two of which have white, ornamental shutters on either side, and their pointed roofs add to their fairy tale look. On the pavement before them, a wrought iron seat, painted green, encircles a small tree. The effect is only spoiled by a tall, road sign pole, totally out of character in the chocolate box picture made by the cottages.

Three roads form a Y shape in front of the picturesque seat-round-the-tree, and I have to take care I'm not daydreaming as I trundle my shopping trolley on the last part of my route, which takes me by more tiny, elegant, listed buildings, before the modern walls and grilles of Waitrose's underground car park blast fumes across the pavement. A pavement liberally dotted with pigeon droppings, I see, plus a plethora of tiny, fluffy feathers produced by the morning preening session on Waitrose's rooftop.

So I arrive a my destination, and need to concentrate on my shopping list. I may decide to ask you to walk home with me, eventually, to allow you to see the view from the other direction. On the other hand, I may leave you all shopping in Waitrose. At least you won't go hungry!

29 comments:

  1. Hello Jinksy,

    Such a richly detailed walk. I can see the wall and the cottages. To whom should we speak to have the road sign removed?!

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  2. There are several embroiders and pieces of textile art in that post struggling to get out, Jinksy! Hope you are well.

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  3. Ah, Jinksy--
    I am deeply moved by the opportunity to take this stroll with you. I can barely take my eyes off those autumnal bricks. The glow is astounding. Oh, dear, please don't let me trip as my eyes absorb all these delights. I'm feeling a good bit of empathy for Church Hall and its need to shift its weight to rest its weary bones. Left hip, I'm thinking. What will we see on our walk home?

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  4. Lovely walk. Don't buy too much.

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  5. Ah, sure enough, you have the clear eye of a poet, Jinksy. Not only do you live in a most beautiful place, you also have the sight to appreciate all that is there. Wonderful!

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  6. Hi Jinksy

    Really enjoyed this post. See how much we'd miss if we all opted for the home delivery option.

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  7. It is so valuable to notice things on mundane walks, which turn everyday occurrences into special times! Thanks for sharing your walk, I've really enjoyed it.

    On my walk to collect bread from the village this afternoon, I saw with my nose - oh how I love the Autumn scents of leaves, conifers after the rain and earthy mossy fragrances.

    Ah, the glory of shopping!

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  8. What a wonderful walk you have shared with us, can't say I have seen a wall of such colorful bricks....sounds lovely though. Thank you for sharing my friend.......:-) Hugs

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  9. A love ly stroll with you in place and ocuntry I'll never see. Thank you!!!

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  10. jinksy i really appreciate your crystal clear depictions of texture and form in this post. it's an amazing gift you have to evoke such detailed images. thanks steven

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  11. That was a lovely walk! Hope the journey back is just as good.
    Nuts in May

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  12. Lovely walk Jinksy...with all the detailed description you gave, I was able to see it.
    So glad you are one to look up, around, to just notice and appreciate such things.

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  13. Wonderful detail. I walked to Waitrose with you. It takes a special talent to bring alive such a seemingly humdrum walk. You're lucky to have the eyes to see and we're lucky to have the eyes to read.

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  14. Hello my friend sorry if i am not being around here in your blog for such a long time... I have so many important things to do, we are affected by Typhoon Ondoy whoi attacked the Philippines recently, Im helping my dad in fixing the damages brought to us by that natural calamity, I know every thing will be back to normal... Its nice to be here again in your blog
    Hope you have a great day and God Bless

    By the way i got a new site, hope you can visit me there if you have time
    Blue Dreamer

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  15. You are the master of writing detail! I want to call on you when I come to a descriptive scene in my book!

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  16. you sure know how to paint a picture with words. i can see the things you describe. excellent writing!

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  17. What a wonderful walk you had and thank you for taking me along with you.

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  18. That's one difference between your world and mine. You get to walk past a wonderful old church to a quaint sounding grocery store like Waitrose while I get to drive past Walmart on my way to sublime Steves for my groceries. Yes, Steves.

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  19. Beautiful stroll with you, Jinksy...Yes, yes, yes!! YOU enable me to see it all with your exquisite word painting!! Love to you~Janine XO

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  20. Very nice walk, enjoyed it much. Thanks for taking me along.

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  21. What a gift you have for turning the everyday sights into things fascinating and extraordinary. Perhaps on the way home we can stop and sit on the green bench and see the scene from another angle?

    Question for Anvilcloud: Where is Steves grocery??

    Cheers, shirley

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  22. jinksy...another masterful piece of writing..
    I read...I see the wall...walk with you.
    You have written masterfully, as usual.
    Love,
    Jackie

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  23. What detail! I shall read it again! Thankyou Junsky.

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  24. I love that "drinking in the colours..." except here, I would write, "drinking in the colors..."

    A beautiful trip!!!

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  25. Your walk was so rich in imagery that I just sat there reading through your post aover and over. Many thanks.

    Greetings from London.

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  26. You are such an accomplished verbal photographer. I did indeed see it all.. right down to the bird poop under my shoe. You may have been watching your step, but I wasn't. ;)

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  27. hehe, I saw what you saw. As always, you managed to describe it beautifully. As if I joined you en route to Waitrose. Actually, it made me so curious, I googled 'your' St. Faith's Church and there was the actual picture of the building and the wall with the rounded top. What can I say, I must be a snake with cattidude ;-)

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  28. By the way: a very handsome rector ;-)

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