Saturday, 2 April 2011

Down In Devon

Here's a photo of South Pool after a dry summer, when the ducks had to search hard for somewhere to swim! The second cottage in from the right was where my husband's Grandparents lived, and next comes a picture of my daughter and my Mum when we visited the village in about 1973.









You can see it was still a quiet, rural place, far from the hustle and bustle of modern day life.


I already told you the story of the gentleman we met that day, called Perry Caunter, the person who taught my husband to be patient when weeding a field of carrots by hand, and here he is for you to say hello to, as well.

These are my little trio of time warp pictures for this week's Sepia Saturday. I think they each tell their own stories, without my help.

23 comments:

  1. That middle photo of your mother and daughter is very well composed. Very nice.

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  2. A very pleasant look back. I wonder if it's changed much - more traffic, probably.

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  3. My mother and eldest daughter would have looked just like that then , too . Perfect!

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  4. I don't think I could be patient when weeding a field of carrots by hand. That sounds like a nightmare to me.

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  5. Oh what a lovely place! This is exactly the kind of little town so interesting and filled with life that I found fun to visit while I was in England...I can't wait for my next visit! Very nice post!

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  6. They tell their own story indeed, particularly the engaging smile in that last photograph. Such an enjoyable post, thanks.

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  7. These photos make me wish I could go see the village myself.

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  8. This looks like how I imagine the English countryside to look. :-) I do enjoy your photos!

    Pearl

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  9. I enjoyed your photographic memories. I didn't make it to Devon during any of my brief trips to England; my loss, I see.

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  10. That rural location looks idyllic. I WANT A HOLIDAY!!!!!

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  11. Wonderful, wonderful!

    I just love thatched roofs! Why don't we have them here in the states? Our house presently needs a new roof... Maybe I should start something... :)

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  12. When in Ireland a couple of years ago, my sister and I were trying so hard to see a thatched roof. Just the typical Irish type village house. Could we find one - no. I'm sure there are some there somewhere, but not where we were. So I really enjoyed your photos of the roofs that we missed.
    Nancy
    Ladies of the grove

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  13. Thank you for taking us along memory lane!

    Weeding a field of carrots does sound intimidating, to say the least.
    Wonder how small the plants were. Tiny ones are really hard to separate from weeds. ;-)

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  14. I so enjoy photos of English cottages and scenery. There is just something romantic and cozy about them.
    QMM

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  15. I enjoyed seeing these photos Pen. Its good to be able to look back huh? I maintain that a photo freezes time. And weeding a field of carrots? Mmmm, I would not like to do that! - Dave

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  16. My back still aches from weeding carrots 60 years ago in a village in Rutland. Your pictures say it all.

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  17. Very picturesque - I bet the view hasn't changed much since 1973! Perry looks like just the sort you would need around if you had a whole field of carrots to weed :-) Jo

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  18. a charming location if a tad quiet for my taste...
    :D~
    HUGZ

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  19. What a lovely village. Looks like the sort of place I'd love to live.

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  20. I wish I could creep into your time warp. Delightful.

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  21. I always marvel at villages in The UK. They are an art form.

    Here in NZ a town is a town, just a gathering of houses, and a few shops in the main street, but nothing artistic about the whole collection at all. The only thing to comment about may be the coloured roofs (rooves - never sure about that one).

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  22. PS I just googled roofs/rooves. Seems that in Australia and NZ we use rooves, but the rest of the world accepts roofs.

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