Monday, 17 August 2009

In Hiding?

In an idle moment this afternoon, I picked up my copy of 'The Littlest One His Book' and began leafing through the well loved pages...
The poems and illustrations are all old friends of mine, but just as with people, there's always the chance to notice something new, despite the number of years shared together.

I suddenly registered the fact I'd been mentioned by name (sort of) in this tale. See how fast you can spot me?

Breavin' On The Window-Pane

It's cold and grey an' still outside,
And everything is wet with rain.
I'm standing on the cushion seat
And breavin' on the window-pane,
An' drawin' pictures with me 'and.
The window's high against the sky -
I can't see out unless I stand.

I've drawn a house an' chimley-pot;
I've drawn a man an chil'den too,
A napple an' a toasting fork,
An' someone who is jus' like you,
And Gran'ma sittin' in the rain.
The pane's so small I've filled it all,
And 'speks I'll have to breave again.

But Jane has spoilt it now; she says
I want a whippin' - an' I don't.
She's rubbed the window clean, and says
She'll fetch a policeman - but she won't.
And now she's gone downstairs again . . .
I'm breavin' on the window-pane.
I'll draw a nugly one of Jane.

20 comments:

  1. Well the best I saw was napple.

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  2. Same here, as Dr. John. Do yo know, gardener still says chimbley and lots of lovely words like hat. i shall have to collect them and put them in a story.

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  3. What a cute poem....and I did see napple. Has to be you.
    Have a great day.....:-) Hugs

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  4. When I see an apple...now I will think of a napple.

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  5. Delightful! "A napple," of course... that would be you!

    I like everything about this little poem. Have never heard of 'The Littlest One His Book' but it must be marvelous if it contains more along that line.

    Thanks for sharing.

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  6. Lovely childlike language. I wonder if you are Grandma Napple.... but can't imagine you sitting in the rain.

    Love Granny

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  7. You are definitely in there twice, as "a napple" and also as "Gran'ma sittin' in the rain."

    I have always enjoyed breavin' on window-panes and mirrors. Makes me know I'm alive.

    Thanks for showing us this poem!

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  8. Hello Jinksy,

    A lovely, innocent poem, just like what we are! And, of course, like the rest I spotted you!

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  9. Lovely! That definitely a touch of the Awwws about it.

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  10. Ah yes a napple an' a toasting fork. How sweet

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  11. We had napples too at home....
    Great poem. I'm quitting for now due to lack of time. I'll see you here from time to time.

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  12. We use the misplaced 'n'fairly often around here. Even my dog knows to be offended when I tell him he's being a nidiot. It's great that you still have such an old friend. My childhood poetry collections are falling to pieces but they're still on the shelf.

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  13. Oh, what a lovely poem! Very evocative of childhood and its simple pleasures, often ruined by grown-ups with their own agendas!

    Love the language!

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  14. I don't know this book, but I must find it for my nieces and nephews (own son too old now, sadly) this poem is perfect for getting little ones interested in poetry, joy!

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  15. Line 10, of course! Excellent!

    (I am supremely jealous. Being Suldog, I expect that I shall never see a poem writ that mentions me.)

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  16. Oh what a wonderful poem, I love the speech. Napple of course. Such pictures it conjures up and not just the ones he draws.

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  17. This reminds me of windows in Michigan in the winter when I was growing up. I used to draw on them with my finger when they were frosted.

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