Thursday, 6 May 2010

Horses For Courses

If only this could be applied to today's election, so the powers that be could make certain who ever wins will be the party we need to keep the country afloat in a style to which we are rapidly becoming unaccustomed, if you get my drift.
But enough of depressing political stuff. Let's stick with the first word of my title, 'Horses'.

Yesterday afternoon, on my way to having a smashing time at my nearest bottle bank, what should I see coming towards me as I approached the cross roads junction by the main road, but a horse and trap. It's not often we get to see one of those around here, and even less often from a full frontal angle.

Not being in the least a horse connoisseur, it was never the less obvious that the one before me would never win any beauty competitions, or horse shows, come to that. A rusty, golden brown animal with white stripes or patches here and there for a bit of light relief, it trotted closer while I watched in fascination at the strange way its front legs moved. They almost appeared to dislocate at the joints, then fall back into place with each step. Perhaps a head-on view of any trotting horse always looks the same - I wouldn't know.

It was very well behaved, and carefully stood still and looked both ways before turning into the main road, just as a child might do when waiting to cross. It gave the impression it was in charge, not the young lad driving alongside his mate in the trap.

My mind immediately made an association with BBC's Listen With Mother programme, where the following ditties would be sung occasionally, back in the days when my kiddywinks were tiny. I only wish I could sing them for you, complete with the Radio Workshop's best sound effects which always accompanied them...

This is the way the ladies ride

This is the way the ladies ride,
Trit trot, trit trot, trit trot, trit trot
This is the way the ladies ride,
Trit trot, trit trot. Trit trot.

This is the way the gentlemen ride,
Gallop, gallop, gallop, gallop.
This is the way the gentlemen ride,
Gallop, gallop, gallop.

This is the way the farmer rides
Jiggety-jog, jiggety-jog,
This is the way the farmer rides
Jiggety- jiggety-jog.

This is the way the old man rides
Hobble-dee, hobble-dee, hobble-dee, hobble-dee
This is the way the old man rides
Hobble-dee, hobble-dee, hobble-dee - and down into the ditch!

The clattering coconut-shell hoof beats that always accompanied this last line, used to send my two into giggles without fail, and the programme would be rounded up with the following little song- probably after a short, horse related story. Those were the days!

Horsie horsie don't you stop

Horsie horsie don't you stop
Just let you feet go clippety clop
Your tail goes swish
And the wheels go round
Giddy up we're homeward bound

25 comments:

  1. Awww, a horsey for jinksy. you could have done your smashing in time with the clip-clop, and sung the ditty.
    if only I could have been near with a camera.

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  2. One doesn't know what to say sometimes.

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  3. I like a good horse story and who knows; soon we may all be going about our business, to the tune of our horse's clippety-clop or hobbledy-dee-dee.

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  4. I always taught the 'Horsie' song to my Kindergarten children but with an extra verse 'Horsie, horsie, on your way, You've been a-traveling many a day' I forget what came after that.

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  5. I loved horsies when I was three and I still love horsies now. We moved seven years ago to an area where there are many stables and horse farms, exchanging suburban life for retirement in a more rural area -- and we love it. You and your kiddywinds would see plenty of horsies around here.

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  6. kiddywinks -- third time's the charm.

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  7. I know I am going to spend the rest of the day now clippety clopping in my mind :0)

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  8. Yeah, I can see how one thing leads to another, and so on to a poem, and so on to another. Who else would know these things but you dear one. Thanks for the nursery rhymes.

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  9. That horsie song was popular here too.. and always accompanied by a bouncing knee ride for the kidlets. Trit-trot was a gentle ride but the gallops got them bouncing in the air a bit. Jiggity jog swayed they from side to side and down in the ditch was the parents' clue to suddenly extend the supporting foot so that the child would take a quick drop. My kidlets got that ride from time to time. :)

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  10. LOL. I've never heard either of those songs, but how cute!

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  11. Hello Jinksy,

    I'm afraid these aren't my vintage. Bill & Ben, Woodentops, Andy Pandy, Tales of the River Bank etc. But no horsie songs!

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  12. I can remember clearly the words to nursery rhymes I learned as a kid, but to remember anything now? Almost impossible!

    Keeping my fingers crossed for your election!

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  13. We had a similar song....
    Trot little horsie go to town; Trot little horsie don't fall down!

    ...Wanda♥

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  14. Two songs my Granma used to sing to me, but as for the political angle, don't most voters go for horses from the same stable? That's what they mean by stable government, no?

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  15. I'm familiar with the "Hilary" version.
    I recall my nephew vomiting at about the "te-gallop, te-gallop, te-gallop" point...

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  16. *Horsey horsey don't you stop* was my youngest granddaughter's favourite nursery song. I used to sing it while I brushed her teeth!

    I love to see a horse and coach.They are a common sight when visiting Bath.

    Nuts in May

    Nuts in May

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  17. Yes, trotting horses' legs do look rather strange from head on, don't they? LOL!

    Those rhymes are so familiar to me, and yet I'd forgotten all about them! Thanks for the nostalgia!

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  18. I don't think that I've ever heard these!

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  19. Since most of my experience with horses has been to see my money disappear when they finish sixth, I'll decline comment on them. However, I do have to say that I hope the Monster Raving Looney Party wins a few seats, and I would love nothing more than to see such a crew over here adding spice to things :-)

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  20. I enjoyed the horsey songs, neither of which was familiar. It's lovely to learn new things.

    Please, Miss... what's a "bottle bank?"

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  21. My grandfather used to bounce me on his knees and sing this is the way the ladies ride song......I had forgotten about it.....it is good to remember, thank you my friend..:-) Hugs

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  22. I think we even heard this song here years ago. Truly international stuff. We don't see many horses up close these days so I can understand your interest while driving. A nice bit of reminiscing. - Dave

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  23. Smashing time at the bottle bank indeed! LOL

    Trotting horses do look weird when you watch them coming straight towards you. Some more so than others though. My father calls that 'Charlie Chaplin-legs', which is a rather accurate description I think.

    ;-)

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  24. My mother use to sing This is the way the Ladies ride, when I was little. She would bounce me on her knee! Thanks for the memory!

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