Friday, 20 March 2009

Blog Hopping

Many a journey begins with a hop. We say 'Hop in the car...' : 'Hop on a bike...' : 'Hop in a plane...' All singularly strange expressions for two legged people, not closely related to kangaroos, that is, as far as I can see and Darwin not withstanding. Such strange expressions that make their way into common parlance are a source of wonder to me. If we could rewind Time and go back to the very first occasion the expression had been used by some unknown Tom, Dick or Harry - or even Thomasina, Dulcie or Harriet, they might have earned a place in our History Books as an innovator of language. Instead, the phrases gradually seep though the social layers and generations, spreading out like ink on blotting paper. The edges blur, and we begin to assume they have been in use for ever.

This brings another problem. Can you imagine a Roman soldier, bedecked in shiny breastplate and plumed helmet, calling out to his cohort 'Come on, men, HOP in your chariots' ( or 'HOP on your horses!') The picture is enough to make an ancient Brit laugh, let alone a modern one.
**** Curses! I have lost my cursor. It has gone AWOL and I find it extremely disconcerting, to say the least. How can I make amendments to my crap typing, when I'm unable to position myself where necessary?Anything may happen from here on in....

What I really meant to talk about this morning, was the Blog Hopping Tour I took yesterday, to catch up on what I'd missed the two preceding days. Curses retracted****; the cursor has deigned to return.

There were belated Birthday Wishes to hand out at rhymeswithplague - yet another Pisces Person in our watery Blogland Pool - and more icy photos to shiver at with Raindrops and The Smitten Image, where Hilary's chilliest shots made me remember...

Early one bright, cold morning, I was on a train going to Southampton. It was October or November time, so although the trees had dropped their summer finery, Winter had yet to claim the land with any degree of certainty. I watched through the windows as townscape slowly changed to countryside and fields and hedges flickered by outside. Then for reasons known only to the engine driver and British Rail, we slowed to a gentle crawl, giving me time to properly appreciate the view outside. Luckily, I had pen and notebook on hand, and was able to record these images for posterity.

From The Palette Of Turner

The sky is opalescent this morning;
rays of delicate winter sunshine
caress frosted field and dark tracery
of tree and hedgerow.

Ice crystal ringed puddles,
glassy,
shining in low slanting sun.

Misty boats on water.

Brown gold leaves
dead on branch or ground,
add simulated warmth
to a landscape coloured cold.

17 comments:

  1. Oh Jinksy, another beautiful poem. The sunshine is doing the same to the landscape now, adding simulated warmth.

    Hopped to your blog, of course to read it, but also to tell you, in case you wouldn't hop back to mine where I left the following in the commentbox for you: the Dutch for Helleborus foetidus (and I'm not making this up) is: Stinkend Nieskruid = Smelly Sneezeherb. Isn't that hilarious? It just occurred to me while reading your comment.

    Hugs xx my friend

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  2. Just the mood I was in too. But, you got the camera out first, and the dictionary, and the cursor. NO. Give that one back to me. I must have an obedient cursor.

    Jinksy, I don't know if your name is an alias like mine, but it fits you well. Top of the day to you.

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  3. I loved the poem Jinksy!

    Have a great day!

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  4. Ice crystal ring-ed
    puddles, glassy,
    shining in low slanting sun.

    Jinksy, this is very nearly a haiku in its own right - You are such a talented Wordsmith. x

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  5. I had the same thought as the previous commenter, but amplified. The entire poem struck me as fragments of haiku drifting in open water. (That's supposed to be a compliment, by the way.)

    And I love the word opalescent.

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  6. ... a landscape coloured cold ...

    That is wonderful! Bravo! I shall return (if you don't mind).

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  7. Lovely poem, Jinsky. I'm glad your peek at my blog triggered the memory. I never even heard the front door. ;)

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  8. rays of delicate winter sunshine
    caress frosted field and dark tracery
    of tree and hedgerow.

    This is so wonderfully visual, it made me stop breathing for a moment with an attempt to hold on to the picture. Oh, to have HALF of your illustrative talent!

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  9. Love the poem today. Happy hoppin'!

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  10. I like that you have a pen at the ready. I had to throw down my vacuum today to trace a quick one out. Feels good, doesn't it? And this was one worth holding onto.

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  11. It seems to me Jinksy that British Rail did something right that day!

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  12. Lovely imagery. It reminded me of the first verse of a poem I've known since childhood, called The Ballad of Yaada, by E. Pauline Johnson.
    There are fires on Lulu Island, and the sky is opalescent
    With the pearl and purple tinting from the smouldering of peat;
    And the Dream Hills lift their summits in a sweeping hazy crescent,
    With the Capilano Canyon at their feet.

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  13. Belated Happy Birthday! Sorry I am a bit behind with things at the moment. Glad your cursor has re-appeared!

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  14. We do have some strange idioms that defy literalism.

    You take great pictures with your pen.

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  15. You are just amazing! LOVE LOVE LOVE the poem! Jenni

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  16. So glad I hopped over here today! ALways enjoy your talks!

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